MyD Banner

CGM Subsidy

CGM is a lot more expensive than blood glucose monitoring and, unlike blood glucose testing strips, it is not subsidised through the NDSS. The cost of CGM isn’t covered by private health funds or Medicare.

However, children and young people with type 1 diabetes aged under 21 years now have access to subsidised CGM products through the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) if they meet certain criteria.

To be eligible for this initiative you must be registered with the NDSS and meet the following criteria:

For children 10 years or younger

  • it is expected that using CGM will help them in managing their diabetes
  • their family/carer must be willing and able to use CGM
  • their family/carer must be willing to be involved in a diabetes management plan that includes CGM

Children who meet these criteria and begin using subsidised CGM products will continue to have subsidised access after they turn 11 (until they are 21).

For young people aged 11 to less than 21 years

  • it is expected that using CGM will help them in managing their diabetes
  • the young person or their family/carer must be willing and able to use CGM
  • the young person or their family/carer must be willing to be involved in a diabetes management plan that includes CGM

They also need to meet one of four extra criteria, related to a hypo (low glucose levels):

  • they have had more than one hypo a year requiring help from another person
  • they have difficulties detecting the symptoms of hypos
  • they are unable to recognise or tell someone about their symptoms of a hypo
  • they have a significant fear of hypos which is affecting their health or wellbeing or causing them to have regular high glucose levels

For both groups, subsidised access ceases after the age of 21.

The subsidy covers the full cost of sensors and transmitters but the cost of a receiver, if preferred over the use of an insulin pump or smartphone, will need to be paid for by you.

How do I choose a device?

There are currently five CGM devices available in through the NDSS.  The device you choose will depend on whether the CGM will be used in conjunction with an insulin pump, a compatible smartphone or separate receiver, whether you want the option of sharing CGM data, and personal preference. Speak with your diabetes health professional for help in choosing a device which suits you best.

You can also find more about teh devices and their compatibility by downloading this fact sheet.

How do I get started?

To access CGM sensors and transmitters through the NDSS, you will need to see an authorised health professional, such as an endocrinologist or credentialled diabetes educator. If you are eligible, your health professional will need to fill out and sign the NDSS Continuous Glucose Monitoring Eligibility Assessment form. Once the form has been submitted and processed you will be contacted to confirm eligibility. 

For those new to using CGM, a starter kit will be sent to the health professional nominated on your form. They can help you to set up and show you how to use the device.  Following training, and for those who are already using CGM, CGM products can be accessed through any NDSS Access Point (usually your local community pharmacy) in the same way you access blood glucose strips, insulin pen needles and/or pump consumables.

This booklet explains everything you need to know about starting, using and transitioning off CGM.

What if I’m not eligible?

If not eligible for the subsidy, you can still use CGM but will need to pay the full cost of the sensors and transmitters. You can find out more about the costs and how to access CGM products by contacting the CGM supplier directly.

AMSL Diabetes (for Dexcom products)

Website: amsldiabetes.com.au

Phone: 1300 851 056

Medtronic

Website: medtronic-diabetes.com.au

Phone: 1800 668 670