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Anonymous
02.05.2010

Diabetes and the HSC the inevtiable duo for any adolescent in secondary education. Whilst these two on their own are like a natural disaster, imagine having to deal with both of them at the same time! It would be like the twin towers and New Orleans sinking at the same time, the only difference is its going on in your HEAD. With the perfect diagnosis of STRESS! Diabetes as my doctor put it, is one of those precarious diseases which unlike having the detriment of Leukemia requires ongoing monitoring and treatment. At times it becomes soo tedious that we all just like to ignore it and move on, but reality hits us in the face when we start feeling sick for not bolusing. My name is not quiet important, but whats more important is that i am 17 and i have had type one diabetes for 14 years of my life. Yes i was diagnosed when i was 3! The HSC in itself is not quiet stable and with the added responsibility of diabetes your life becomes a rollercoaster! I believed in the beginning it was important to only focus on my HSC, so my diabetes went to the bottom of my priorties But when the truth smacked me in the face with a hbA1c of 10.4. i realised something is wrong here. The key is to understand that your diabetes is like any other limb of your body, part of you and the onus is upon you to control it. I want to do well in my HSC, but i realised that i had to take care of myself to do well, well it was part realisation part 1hr lecturing from my doctor, but still. If your stubborn and are thinking another inspirational story, well look at it this way, the higher your diabetes, the less information you retain effecting you cognitively, at first this is ok, but continuous distraction in class and loss of concentration can amount to the loss of 5-6 ATAR points which may be the potential difference between getting into International Commerce and Buisness. so my fellow HSC do'ers and diabetics, its time to bite the bullet and take care of ourselves because remember HSC is a b*$%h but diabetes is worse in the long term