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Anonymous
25.05.2009

telling people. when i was diagnosed with diabetes at 19 years of age, i had troubles deciding who to tell. i didnt want to tell too many people because i wanted things ot stay normal. some peopel i told i expected to receive full support but i didnt. then in some people i thought they woudlnt be there for me, but they reached out. i foudn that i had expectations, like for my family i expected them to be there for me. but some were in denial, and made it soudn like i was making it up. that was really tough on me. they said because it was so common in the family there is no necessity to give sympathy. i didnt need sympathy, just support. one cousin had said to me "just because you were diagnosed it doesnt mean you have it", that was real tough, as in that period i was tryign to get my head aroudn it, and accept it. it made me feel like i was making it up for attention or something. i was so greatful to have my friends for support. intially they didnot know how to respond. but they were there for me, listened to what i had to say. having their support made everythign easier and it made me apprecitae my friends more. one thing i learnt is that not everyoen knows how to respond, hence it might not be that they're ignoring the situation. this is one of the hardest things i have had to do, because i was diagnosed during a hard time of my life where thinsg were already overwhelming. but that stage of sadness does go away. i never thought it would, but all the tears, its finally not the only thing on my mind anymore. at that time, everywhere i went, or everythin i did reminded me of my diabetes, i thought the feeling would never go away. talking helps, peopel tend to bottle up their problems. but sharing your story wiht someone else and showing your weaknesses does not make u less strong. it only shows that you are brave enough to share your vulnerabilities and that you have that kind of trust relationship with someone.